Difference between revisions of "Polar vortex"

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'''Polar Vortex'''. Click ''Edit'' at the top and copy the text to use in your article. See [[Help:Creating articles|creating articles]] for more information. 
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The polar vortex is an area of low pressure. It is located over the Earth’s poles, between the upper troposphere and the stratosphere levels.<ref>Polar vortex - AMS Glossary. (2015, October 6). Retrieved February 20, 2016, from [http://glossary.ametsoc.org/wiki/Polar_vortex]</ref> A weakening in the polar vortex caused by other natural events, such as a volcanic eruption, cause it to almost break away from its normal residence at the poles. When it breaks away, it heads towards the equator. Its at this point that we experience the cold bust of air. <ref>MacMath, J. (2014, November 12). What is a Polar Vortex? Retrieved January 28, 2016, from [http://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/what-is-a-polar-vortex/21793077]</ref>
  
The polar vortex is an area of low pressure. It is located over the Earth’s poles, between the upper troposphere and the stratosphere levels.  
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== Location ==
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Contrary to what most believe, the location of the vortex is not actually where humans inhabit on earth. The polar vortex are located on the Earth's magnetic poles. Once you have located the poles you have to then go straight up until you are between the upper troposphere and the stratosphere levels.<ref>Fischetti, M. (2016, February 12). [http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/what-is-this-polar-vortex-that-is-freezing-the-u-s/ What Is This Polar Vortex That Is Freezing the U.S.]. Retrieved September 1, 2016</ref>
  
== First heading ==
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== Climate Change ==
The main headings in the article are ''second'' level headings, defined with two equals signs in the wikitext. You never need to use the top-level heading style, defined with one equals sign, as it is reserved for article titles. As with a scientific article, you have plenty of freedom about how to organize your content, but the reader may have some expectations about the order and style that you may want to take into account. <ref>Mooney et al., 2013. [http://www.pnas.org/content/110/Supplement_1/3665.full Evolution of natural and social science interactions in global change research programs]. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, v. 110, p. 3665-3672.</ref>.
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It is believed that the reason the polar vortex is moving so much from the poles, is from climate change. It is has claims that because of melting ice caps the less ice there is the easier it can be pushed off the pole.
  
Start with a brief bit of background about the subject. Relate it to other topics, using plenty of links. Create links with a pair of square brackets around key technical words and phrases.
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Although that does play a part, that's not the only reason it shifts. Because of this the ozone levels are decreasing. With everything changing and levels of CO2 rising and being drawn to the poles it becomes highly concentrated and depletes the ozone layer.<ref>Polar vortex visits to U.S. linked to climate change. (2014, September 2). Retrieved February 20, 2016, from [http://www.usatoday.com/story/weather/2014/09/02/polar-vortex-climate-change/14973047/]</ref>
 
 
=== Subheading ===
 
In longer articles, it may make sense to have another level of headings. There are not many occasions when you will need to use '''H4''' headings (four '''=''' signs), so don't go there unless it's unavoidable. Never use more than four.<ref>Matt Hall, 2013, pers. comm. Sorry, this is the best reference I can find.</ref>
 
 
 
== Second heading ==
 
[[File:.jpg|thumb|This is my great caption]]
 
You can add as many sections as you think you need to 'spiral out' from the core of the topic. Use judgment to decide when to split out a separate article.  
 
 
 
=== Subheading ===
 
In longer articles, it may make sense to have another level of headings. There are not many occasions when you will need to use '''H4''' headings (four '''=''' signs), so don't go there unless it's unavoidable. Never use more than four.<ref>Matt Hall, 2013, pers. comm. Sorry, this is the best reference I can find.</ref>
 
  
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[[File:th.jpg|thumb|Radar of Polar Vortex]]
 
== See also ==
 
== See also ==
 
Other closely related articles in this wiki include:  
 
Other closely related articles in this wiki include:  
  
* [[Aquaculture]]
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* [[Magnetic poles]]
* [[Hydrography]]
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* [[Northern Hemisphere]]
* [[Extremophiles]]
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* [[Arctic poles]]
* [[Mariana Trench]]
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* [[Volcano]]
  
 
== References ==
 
== References ==
 
 
{{reflist}}
 
{{reflist}}
 
  
  
 
== External links ==
 
== External links ==
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{{search}}
 
Relevant online sources to this wiki article include:
 
Relevant online sources to this wiki article include:
  
 
* The home page of [http://www.bw.psu.edu/ Penn State Brandywine], the home of the EARTH 100 wiki article writers!
 
* The home page of [http://www.bw.psu.edu/ Penn State Brandywine], the home of the EARTH 100 wiki article writers!
* [http://www.eoearth.org/ Encyclopedia of Earth] - one of the sites I want you to explore to look for supporting articles.
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* [http://scijinks.jpl.nasa.gov/polar-vortex/ NASA: Polar Vortex]
* You should also search the websites for NASA, NOAA, USGS, EPA, and the [http://education.nationalgeographic.com/encyclopedia/ National Geographic Education Encyclopedia].
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* [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KEkSfgHJNk NASA: Polar Vortex-YouTube]
* Please DO NOT list the long URLs here! Let the user hover over text to get to a website (such as the examples provided above).
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* [https://weather.com/science/weather-explainers/news/polar-vortex-shifting-away-from-north-america-climate The Weather Channel]
  
 
[[Category: Basics]]
 
[[Category: Basics]]

Latest revision as of 17:57, 14 December 2016

The polar vortex is an area of low pressure. It is located over the Earth’s poles, between the upper troposphere and the stratosphere levels.[1] A weakening in the polar vortex caused by other natural events, such as a volcanic eruption, cause it to almost break away from its normal residence at the poles. When it breaks away, it heads towards the equator. Its at this point that we experience the cold bust of air. [2]

Location

Contrary to what most believe, the location of the vortex is not actually where humans inhabit on earth. The polar vortex are located on the Earth's magnetic poles. Once you have located the poles you have to then go straight up until you are between the upper troposphere and the stratosphere levels.[3]

Climate Change

It is believed that the reason the polar vortex is moving so much from the poles, is from climate change. It is has claims that because of melting ice caps the less ice there is the easier it can be pushed off the pole.

Although that does play a part, that's not the only reason it shifts. Because of this the ozone levels are decreasing. With everything changing and levels of CO2 rising and being drawn to the poles it becomes highly concentrated and depletes the ozone layer.[4]

Radar of Polar Vortex

See also

Other closely related articles in this wiki include:

References

  1. Polar vortex - AMS Glossary. (2015, October 6). Retrieved February 20, 2016, from [1]
  2. MacMath, J. (2014, November 12). What is a Polar Vortex? Retrieved January 28, 2016, from [2]
  3. Fischetti, M. (2016, February 12). What Is This Polar Vortex That Is Freezing the U.S.. Retrieved September 1, 2016
  4. Polar vortex visits to U.S. linked to climate change. (2014, September 2). Retrieved February 20, 2016, from [3]


External links

find literature about
Polar vortex
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Relevant online sources to this wiki article include: