Marine ecosystem

ADVERTISEMENT
From SEG Wiki
Revision as of 09:40, 29 October 2015 by Jeffsteinmann (talk | contribs) (Added external links)
Jump to: navigation, search

This page is currently being authored by an undergraduate researcher at Penn State Brandywine. The page will be posted before the end of November 2015. Marine ecosystems make up the largest aquatic system in the world covering more then 70 percent of the planet. Marine ecosystems are considered to be the habitats that completes the large system from the shores to the dark abandoned sea floor. The marine ecosystem includes: marshes, tidal zones, estuaries, the mangrove forest, lagoons, seagrass beds, the sea floor, and the coral reefs. Just like every other ecosystem in the world, the aquatic ecosystems feed off each other maintaining a balanced marine ecosystem. The marine ecosystems are important to the world, because without them the marine life would not have any shelter, which will eventually make the marine life go extinct.

First heading

The main headings in the article are second level headings, defined with two equals signs in the wikitext. You never need to use the top-level heading style, defined with one equals sign, as it is reserved for article titles. As with a scientific article, you have plenty of freedom about how to organize your content, but the reader may have some expectations about the order and style that you may want to take into account. [1].

Start with a brief bit of background about the subject. Relate it to other topics, using plenty of links. Create links with a pair of square brackets around key technical words and phrases.

Subheading

In longer articles, it may make sense to have another level of headings. There are not many occasions when you will need to use H4 headings (four = signs), so don't go there unless it's unavoidable. Never use more than four.[2]

Second heading

Eagle-ford-gets-spotlight04.jpg

You can add as many sections as you think you need to 'spiral out' from the core of the topic. Use judgment to decide when to split out a separate article.

Subheading

In longer articles, it may make sense to have another level of headings. There are not many occasions when you will need to use H4 headings (four = signs), so don't go there unless it's unavoidable. Never use more than four.[3]

See also

Other closely related articles in this wiki include:

References

  1. Mooney et al., 2013. Evolution of natural and social science interactions in global change research programs. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, v. 110, p. 3665-3672.
  2. Matt Hall, 2013, pers. comm. Sorry, this is the best reference I can find.
  3. Matt Hall, 2013, pers. comm. Sorry, this is the best reference I can find.


External links

Add any other relevant external links in the section.

  • How the whales are being disturbed [1], by NOAA Marine Studies
  • [2] - by NASA Marine Studies
  • This page is a study by NOAA about the marine mammals [3].
  • This page shows the different species in the ocean [4]
  • This page is by the EPA [5].
  • Please DO NOT list the long URLs here! Let the user hover over text to get to a website (such as the examples provided above).