Difference between revisions of "Dictionary:Interval velocity"

From SEG Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
(Prepared the page for translation)
(Marked this version for translation)
 
Line 3: Line 3:
 
</translate>
 
</translate>
 
{{lowercase}}
 
{{lowercase}}
<translate>{{#category_index:I|interval velocity}}
+
<translate><!--T:1-->
 +
{{#category_index:I|interval velocity}}
 
The velocity of an interval in the subsurface measured by determining the traveltime over a depth interval along some raypath. <b>1</b>. In sonic log determinations the interval may be 1 to 3 ft; in well surveys it may be 1000 ft or more. Usually refers to P-wave velocity. <b>2</b>. The average velocity of the interval in the subsurface between two reflections. Often used for velocity calculated by the [[Special:MyLanguage/Dictionary:Dix_formula|''Dix Formula'']] (q.v.) from velocities measured from normal moveout, which implies horizontal constant-velocity layers.
 
The velocity of an interval in the subsurface measured by determining the traveltime over a depth interval along some raypath. <b>1</b>. In sonic log determinations the interval may be 1 to 3 ft; in well surveys it may be 1000 ft or more. Usually refers to P-wave velocity. <b>2</b>. The average velocity of the interval in the subsurface between two reflections. Often used for velocity calculated by the [[Special:MyLanguage/Dictionary:Dix_formula|''Dix Formula'']] (q.v.) from velocities measured from normal moveout, which implies horizontal constant-velocity layers.
 
</translate>
 
</translate>

Latest revision as of 03:37, 6 March 2017

Other languages:
English • ‎español


The velocity of an interval in the subsurface measured by determining the traveltime over a depth interval along some raypath. 1. In sonic log determinations the interval may be 1 to 3 ft; in well surveys it may be 1000 ft or more. Usually refers to P-wave velocity. 2. The average velocity of the interval in the subsurface between two reflections. Often used for velocity calculated by the Dix Formula (q.v.) from velocities measured from normal moveout, which implies horizontal constant-velocity layers.