Difference between revisions of "Dictionary:Anisotropy/es"

From SEG Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
(Created page with "Anisotropía")
 
(Created page with "Variación de una propiedad fisica dependiendo de la dirección en la que es medida. Anisotropia implica variación direccional en un punto, opuesto a hetereogeneidad que impl...")
Line 2: Line 2:
 
{{lowercase}}{{#category_index:A|anisotropy}}
 
{{lowercase}}{{#category_index:A|anisotropy}}
 
(an, ī so’ tr∂p ē or a nī’ sō tr∂p ē)  
 
(an, ī so’ tr∂p ē or a nī’ sō tr∂p ē)  
Variation of a physical property depending on the direction in which it is measured. Anisotropy involves directional variation at one point as opposed to heterogeneity, which involves variation from point to point. Both anisotropy and heterogeneity are matters of scale, and so their usage relates to the wavelengths involved.  
+
Variación de una propiedad fisica dependiendo de la dirección en la que es medida. Anisotropia implica variación direccional en un punto, opuesto a hetereogeneidad que implica variación de punto a punto. Tanto la anisotropía como heterogeneidad son funciones de la escala, por lo que su uso se relaciona con las longitudes de onda involucradas.  
  
 
Crystals exhibit '''intrinsic anisotropy''' and crystal nomenclature (based on ''[[Dictionary:symmetry_system|symmetry systems]]'', q.v.) is sometimes used to define the types of anisotropy. Plate-like mineral grains and interstices tend to orient themselves parallel to sediment bedding, producing '''granular anisotropy'''. Layering and oriented fractures also can produce anisotropy. '''Aeolotropy''' is also used.<ref>Thomsen, 2002, Understanding seismic anisotropy in exploration and exploitation: SEG-EAEG Distinguished Instructor Series #5: Soc. Expl. Geophys.</ref>  
 
Crystals exhibit '''intrinsic anisotropy''' and crystal nomenclature (based on ''[[Dictionary:symmetry_system|symmetry systems]]'', q.v.) is sometimes used to define the types of anisotropy. Plate-like mineral grains and interstices tend to orient themselves parallel to sediment bedding, producing '''granular anisotropy'''. Layering and oriented fractures also can produce anisotropy. '''Aeolotropy''' is also used.<ref>Thomsen, 2002, Understanding seismic anisotropy in exploration and exploitation: SEG-EAEG Distinguished Instructor Series #5: Soc. Expl. Geophys.</ref>  

Revision as of 10:59, 6 March 2018

Other languages:
English • ‎español • ‎français

(an, ī so’ tr∂p ē or a nī’ sō tr∂p ē) Variación de una propiedad fisica dependiendo de la dirección en la que es medida. Anisotropia implica variación direccional en un punto, opuesto a hetereogeneidad que implica variación de punto a punto. Tanto la anisotropía como heterogeneidad son funciones de la escala, por lo que su uso se relaciona con las longitudes de onda involucradas.

Crystals exhibit intrinsic anisotropy and crystal nomenclature (based on symmetry systems, q.v.) is sometimes used to define the types of anisotropy. Plate-like mineral grains and interstices tend to orient themselves parallel to sediment bedding, producing granular anisotropy. Layering and oriented fractures also can produce anisotropy. Aeolotropy is also used.[1]

References

  1. Thomsen, 2002, Understanding seismic anisotropy in exploration and exploitation: SEG-EAEG Distinguished Instructor Series #5: Soc. Expl. Geophys.

See also

External links

find literature about
Anisotropy/es
SEG button search.png Datapages button.png GeoScienceWorld button.png OnePetro button.png Schlumberger button.png Google button.png AGI button.png